Nova Health Naturopathic Centre Blog

True Health and Well Being

Weekend Round-Up June 9, 2011

Filed under: diabetes,environment,IBS,research,round up — novahealthnaturopathic @ 4:06 pm

Happy Thursday! With another week ending, we thought we’d give you all some fun and informative reading.

While it’s not a definitive correlation, two researchers have found that a low intake of vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is associated with IBS symptoms. Adults should be getting 1.3mg of this vitamin each day. So for all of you IBS sufferers out there, load up on shiitake mushrooms (0.42mg/cup), steamed broccoli (0.22mg/cup), baked cod (0.52mg/4oz) and bell peppers (0.23mg/cup). Here is a more complete list of B6-rich foods.

Naturopaths have long been wary of what electronic radiation can do to the human body. Research is catching up and the general population is becomign more aware of its effects. Cell phones are the most common source of daily radiation exposure. Time published a handy list of things you can do on a daily basis to limit your exposure to radiation.

Mindfulness exercises such as meditation, tai chi and yoga may help menopausal women ease their hot flashes. This is great news! These exercises would also be effective in dealing with other menopause symptoms such as irritability, headaches and lack of concentration.

Here is an important primer on prediabetes. Prediabetes is basically the warning period that occurs before full-blown diabetes occurs. It can easily be reversed with diet and lifestyle changes, and careful blood sugar monitoring. Modern food is so sugar-filled that a lot of us have wildly fluctuating blood glucose levels and don’t even know it. If you have any of the symptoms listed on page 2 of the link, please see a doctor to have your risk factors assessed!

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Weekend Round Up May 27, 2011

Filed under: cancer,herbs,research,round up,weight loss — novahealthnaturopathic @ 7:25 pm

Hey everyone! Hope you’ve had a fantastic week. Here are some of the health stories that caught our eye this month. Let us know what you think of them. We love feedback!

Tara Parker-Pope wrote in the NY Times about how diet and (lack of) exercise aren’t the only contributors to weight gain. The move to a more sedentary work life, a shift away from factories and toward office jobs, has corresponded with a steady population-wide weight gain. Here are some tips for combating desk-job related fatigue and weight gain. Have any of you tried these? Anyone use or know someone who uses a standing work station?

This article on the rising rate of childhood cancer hits it on the nose. It’s tragic and unfortunate that so many young people are getting sick. As an ND, it’s important to take age into consideration when treating patients. The young ones definitely have special needs (psychological and physiological) that must be addressed by the physician, but they are also often the most hopeful and inspiring patients of all.

This article on the health benefits of common herbs is making us consider planting an herb garden here at the clinic. Who knew sage was such an antioxidant?!

For those interested in osteoporosis, it’s always interesting when a research conflict like this emerges! I guess only time (and a lot of research dollars) will tell who was right.

That’s all for now! Hope to here some of your insights. Have a fun, healthy and productive weekend!

 

Round-Up Post May 4, 2011

Filed under: heart health,menstruation,prenatal,round up,Uncategorized,weight loss — novahealthnaturopathic @ 6:53 pm

There have been a lot of great studies on health and wellness recently published. Just wanted to share the most important ones with all of you. Make sure to click on the links for more information!

A study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology has confirmed that “waist circumference and hip-waist-ratio to be more reliable than body mass index in stratifying mortality risk in coronary artery disease patients.” In other words, it’s not how much you weight, but where you carry your weight, that is a greater determinant of health. Coronary artery disease is directly linked to an excess of fat tissue around the middle, rather than fat stored in the thighs or buttocks. (Source: CBC News)

We’re all familiar with the role that Vitamin D plays in regulating mood and bone health, but research is showing that a lack of Vitamin D is also linked with multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, dementia and even some cancers. We recommend you get at least 1000IU of Vitamin D per day from food sources, exposure to sunshine and supplementation. The best way to supplement Vitamin D is with an emulsified (liquid) D3 (rather than D2).

The Healthy Skeptic (a great blog!) has published a post about the ways pre-natal health can influence your children’s lifelong health trajectories. This is a must-read for all of you moms-to-be!

And last but not least, for those female athletes out there, it might be a good idea to take it easy on the workouts during the first week of your cycle. Australian researchers have found that thanks to reduced levels of estrogen during menstruation, female athletes are more likely to get injured at the beginning of their cycles than during other times of their cycle. But of course, this doesn’t mean you should skip out on exercise during that week! Numerous studies have shown that exercising helps elevate mood, lessen cramps, reduce bloating and alleviate headaches.

 

Weekly Round-Up December 10, 2010

Filed under: round up — novahealthnaturopathic @ 5:19 pm

Here are links to some of the articles we came across that piqued our interest . Hope you enjoy!

While I’m usually an advocate of vegetarian-oriented eating, this post on ‘paleo’ nutrition, ketosis and the brain is interesting.

Right in time for Christmas, this recipe is delicious AND gluten-free (no sacrifice here!).

A very unusual take on eggnog! Haven’t made it yet, but if you’re brave enough, let us know how it turns out!

Love this idea! Anything that combines recycling, yoga and crafts is ok by me.

Working in naturopathic medicine, we are often confronted with ‘pseudo-scientific’ approaches to health. We always go for evidence-based medicine, and this psychological approach to less-than-scientific medicine is intriguing.

More on this later, but for now, let us know what your thoughts are on the new ‘wonder drug’.

That’s all for now! We hope you have a great weekend!

 

 
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